Letter Re: Long Distance Bug Out Planning

Friday, Jan 4, 2013

Jim:
J.B. mentioned that it is important before and when bugging out to listen to all radio news reports and gather any information concerning the route.  This, of course, depends on somebody still broadcasting.  We must constantly keep up on what’s going on locally and soak up every scrap of information available.  This data is used to update the maps, note the areas to avoid, and make navigation decisions.  It will be important to constantly gather intelligence, adjust plans accordingly, and to be acutely aware of where you are.

Something I found helpful: I picked up a 1000 channel scanner from Radio Shack and updated it using the Internet. (manually inputted all the channels I consider important state and local police, EMS, fire) - and searching around you can find police/EMS/fire and a lot of other info - by county/town/state - I loaded up 300 channels in to my scanner- in hopes of avoiding trouble from Pennsylvania to Indiana on my trips out there. I have a 10 hour drive out to my goal. The unit I have also allows you to seek and lock radio frequencies on the fly, so I can add them as I move in to an area. (hopefully that will be a valuable asset)  You can gain a lot of insight listening to what is going on--car accidents, armed robberies down town, car accidents when the roads ice up, down power lines or a house fire--anything like this can be in your path, so you might get a little warning before you travel in to it. and a little warning makes a big difference, a few weeks ago- I went to get an oil change, and got to hear about multiple accidents on the highways- black ice- I had no idea it was bad, because it hadn't moved in to my end of the valley yet. it was coming my way-  I went for coffee/breakfast and a few hours later it had warmed up enough that it was a rain event. win/win.

Yes, it is expensive, but just so you know it's info- and info is one of the more important things you need when things are bad. In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king. Your primary goal is to avoid all bottlenecks in your path, and find a safe way home. you need to know what locations are with out power (no traffic lights), where the lines/poles are down (roadblocks), what is going on around you in your area. The local law enforcement officers might be on trunked radio frequencies, but then again due to budget cuts it's just as likely they might be on open channels - good news is this radio has trunking ability. (I know the basics- but like most things I'm a beginner. Check out the documentation that comes with it.) Youtube it to learn more about what it can do for you. 

I'm not a lawyer, you might want to consult one before putting this in your car. I'm sure bureaucrats have a law against it- you know for the criminal types. :p

One thing that sticks out from my Marine captain friend who did some time overseas- watch every over pass if you have to go under, go fast- as undesirable people might drop things like Molotov cocktails on your truck or in his case, grenades. bug out travel is no joke- it seems every turn is a bad situation waiting to happen. 

Good luck - hope you find this a helpful addition to your plans. - Mike in Pennsylvania


Copyright 2005-2012 James Wesley, Rawles - SurvivalBlog.com All Rights Reserved